The Bahamas (N. America) 18 February 2022

The Bahamas located in the continent of North America. It has the Atlantic Ocean to the north and east, Haiti and the Dominican Republic to the far southeast, Cuba and Jamaica to the far south, the Caribbean Sea to the west and the United States to the far northwest.

The capital is Nassau.

The official language is English.

The climate is mild throughout the year with temperatures ranging from 60 F to 90F. Hurricanes are prevalent from June to November.

The staples are seafood (specifically conch), lobster, snapper, grouper, pigeon peas and rice, tomatoes, onions, potatoes, Johnny cakes and so much more (https://www.nassauparadiseisland.com/authentic-bahamian-dishes).

https://www.britannica.com/place/The-Bahamas

BAHAMIAN BOILED FISH (https://www.cdkitchen.com/recipes/recs/43/Bahamian_Boiled_Fish17099.shtml):

  • 2 lbs. skinless grouper fillets
  • 2 lemons
  • Salt, to taste
  • 3 TBSP margarine
  • 2 C water
  • ½ lb. potatoes, sliced
  • ½ tsp garlic, chopped
  • 1 TBSP parsley, chopped
  • ½ goat pepper or Scotch bonnet, chopped, or cayenne, to taste
  • 2 large onions, sliced
  • ½ C celery, chopped
  1. Wash fish ad squeeze the juice of half the lemons over the fillets. Sprinkle with salt. Set aside.
  2. Place margarine and water in a nonreactive skillet over medium-high heat.
  3. Add the potatoes, garlic, parsley, hot pepper, salt and juice of 1 lemon.
  4. Bring to a boil and cook about 10 minutes or until potatoes are almost done.
  5. Add the fish, top with onions and celery, immediately reduce heat to simmer, cover and cook fish about 10 minutes or until cooked through.
  6. Do not overcook or let the water boil.
Here is my Bahamian Boiled Fish. I could not find Grouper, so I used Sea Bass instead. Still a great fish and an amazing taste!!


PIGEON PEAS AND RICE (https://foreignfork.com/pigeon-peas-rice/):

  • 8 strips bacon, finely chopped
  • ¾ C chopped onion
  • ½ C red pepper, finely diced
  • 2 C long grain white rice
  • 2 tsp kosher salt
  • 3 TBSP tomato paste
  • 1 tsp oregano
  • 1 tsp ground cumin
  • One 15oz. can pigeon peas, drained and rinsed (can substitute normal canned peas).
  • One 14.5oz. can chopped roasted tomatoes
  • ½ of 15oz. can corn
  • 2 C low sodium chicken stock
  • ¼ C cilantro leaves, finely chopped
  • ¼ C scallions, chopped for garnish
  1. Place a large pan on the stove over medium heat and add the bacon. Flip occasionally until the bacon has cooked through completely.
  2. Remove the bacon from the pan and place on a paper towel lined plate. Use a knife to cut the bacon into bite-sized pieces. Set aside.
  3. Place a large dutch oven or pot over medium heat and add the oil.
  4. Add the onions, red peppers, rice, and salt. Cook, stirring, for 5 minutes, until the onion is soft, and the rice is lightly toasted. Add the tomato paste and cook for 2 to 3 minutes, stirring.
  5. Add the oregano, cumin, pigeon peas, corn, tomatoes, chicken stock and 1 cup of water.
  6. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to a simmer.
  7. Cover the pot with a lid and cook until the rice is tender (without stirring) about 25 to 30 minutes.
  8. Remove the lid and fluff the rice with a fork. Add the bacon back into the rice and stir.
  9. Garnish with cilantro ad scallions. Serve and enjoy!
Here is my Pigeon Peas and Rice! Such a great flavor and a side dish to the boiled fish!!

BAHAMIAN GUAVA DUFF (https://www.cookist.com/guava-duff-bahamian-steamed-pudding-with-rum-sauce/):

  • 12 fresh guavas
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 4 C flour
  • 1 tsp salt
  • ¾ C milk
  • ¼ C butter
  • 1 tsp boiling water
  • 2 TBSP rum
  • ½ C sugar
  • 1 tsp ground allspice
  • 3 tsp baking powder
  • ¾ C shortening
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • 1 C powdered sugar
  • Dash of salt
  1. Peel, seed, and dice the guavas. Strain, reserving the juice.
  2. Place the guava in a saucepan with enough water to cover completely.
  3. Add the sugar, cinnamon, and allspice.
  4. Bring to a simmer and simmer until the guava is soft (if you are using guava jam, canned guavas or pulp, skip this step, but mix in cinnamon and allspice. Add sugar to taste, but you won’t need much if you are using jam).
  5. In a large bowl combine the flour, baking powder and salt and stir well.
  6. Mix in the shortening.
  7. Add the milk and beaten egg and mix well to form a soft dough. Knead until smooth.
  8. Roll out the dough on a floured board.
  9. Spoon on the cooled and cooked guava and spread evenly.
  10. Roll up the dough carefully into a log with a guava spiral.
  11. Seal the edges to prevent the filling from coming out during cooking.
  12. Wrap the dough several layers or baking or parchment paper.
  13. Add at least two layers of foil and tie tightly with kitchen twine.
  14. Place in a large pot of boiling water.
  15. Boil for about 1 hour.
  16. Make sure the dish is large enough for the wrapped duff to fit comfortably, as it will swell during cooking.
  17. After it is cooked, allow to cool down to comfortably warm before cutting it into about 1” thick slices.
  18. Serve with rum sauce

Butter Rum Sauce:

  1. Cream the butter until soft.
  2. Gradually beat in the powdered sugar.
  3. Add the boiling water, salt, and rum and beat until smooth and fluffy.

NOTES: If you can’t find fresh guava, don’t despair. I used 3 cans of tinned guavas, or you can use frozen guava pulp, or guava jam and miss out the cooking of the guavas stage. Let the guava mix cool down before you add it to the pastry base. This makes rolling it up so much easier. You can adapt this recipe to use other sweet fruit fillings if you are not keen on guavas.

Here is my Bahamian Guava Duff. I would make this again, but would use a lot more guava!!!
Here is my overall meal! Great flavors!!!

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