Sudan (Africa) 6 September 2020

Sudan is located in the continent of Africa. It has Egypt to the north, the Red Sea to the northeast, Eritrea to the east, Ethiopia to the southeast, South Sudan to the south, Central African Republic to the southwest, Chad to the west and Libya to the northwest.

The capital is Khartoum.

The official languages are Arabic and English.

The climate is different for the north as it is for the south. In the north it is generally windy, and rainfall is rare. In the south and central areas have rainy seasons. Overall Sudan is a hot country. “Staple Sudanese dishes include millet porridge and mashed fava beans. Bread is also a staple food. Meat stew is eaten. Vegetables available are cabbages, carrots, garlic, okra, onions, peppers, squash, sweet potatoes, and tomatoes. Fruits grown are bananas, citrus fruits, mangoes, papayas and watermelons” (https://worldinfozone.com/country.php?country=Sudan#:~:text=Staple%20Sudanese%2 0dishes%20include%20millet,%2C%20sweet%20potatoes%2C%20and%20tomatoes).

https://www.britannica.com/place/Sudan

SWEET POTATO AND PEANUT STEW (https://www.sneakyveg.com/sudanese-sweet-potato- spinach-peanut-stew/):

  • 1-2 TBSP olive oil
  • 1 Med onion 2 cloves of garlic
  • 2 TBSP tomato purée
  • 4 Med sweet potatoes
  • 2-1/5 C chopped tomatoes
  • 2-1/4 C hot vegetable stock
  • 1 C spinach leaves, shredded or frozen
  • ½ C peanut butter
  1. Heat olive oil in a large saucepan over med heat.
    1. Add a chopped onion and cook for 10 min, stirring often until soft.
    1. Add cloves of chopped garlic, stir and cook for another 1-2 min.
  • Add tomato purée, chopped sweet potatoes, chopped tomatoes and hot vegetable stock.
    • Stir well, bring to a boil, then cover and reduce the heat. Simmer for 15 min or until the sweet potatoes are cooked through.
    • Add spinach and peanut butter and stir well. Cook for 5 more min.
    • Serve with rice or bread or a sorghum porridge to make it really authentic.
    • This dish keeps well so can be made in advance and also freezes well
Here is the Sweet Potato and Peanut Stew. TO be honest I was not sure how this would taste, but the aroma and flavors were fantastic!!!

KISRA (flat bread made from sorghum flour) (http://globaltableadventure.com/recipe/recipe- sudanese-kisra-sorghum-crepes/):

This is usually accompanied by a stew.

  • 2 cups sorghum flour
  • 1-1/2 cups water, plus 1 cup, or as needed
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • unroasted sesame seed oil or the rendered fat from cow brain
  1. mix the sorghum flour with 1-1/2 cups water and let sit overnight (at least 12 hours).
  2. The next day stir in the all purpose flour and last cup of water, to form a thin batter.
  3. Ladle some kisra batter into a greased pan over medium heat. Immediately take a credit card or small scraper and, holding it at a 30 degree angle, spread the batter around smoothly. This can take some practice. Feel free to eat the works in progress.
  4. When the edges begin to curl up like a smile, the kisra is done. This should only take a minute or so.
I broke up the Kisra into bite size pieces. First time making such a thing and I think I will try it again in about a year or so. Still tasted good though!

KUINDIONG (sweetened semolina) (https://www.sbs.com.au/food/recipes/sweetened- semolina-kuindiong):

  • 4.2 C water
  • 2 C natural yogurt
  • 1 C milk
  • 2-7/8 C semolina flour
  • 1-1/8 C sugar

TOPPING:

Miok:

  • 2-1/4 C butter
  • 2 C natural yogurt
  1. Bring the water to the boil in a saucepan and stir in the natural yoghurt.
  2. Reduce heat to low, then add the milk, semolina and sugar. Stir until mixture thickens.
  3. To make miok, melt the butter in a small saucepan over medium heat, then stir in the yoghurt. Bring to the boil, stirring constantly, and continue to cook for 20 minutes or until butter and yogurt separate.

Immediately remove from heat once yoghurt granules turn a pale, nutty color. Serve kuindiong topped with miok.

Here is how my Kuindiong turned out. Again I think I will try this again later after I have cooked and baked other things for about a year or so. Still tasted really good. First time tasting such a thing.

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